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From Rome to Camulod... With Love

New - 20 March 2010


The Mother of All Family Trees

Generations 98 - 103

From Rome to Camulod... With Love

 

Back at the Britannia Ranch/Spa/Battleground...

Generation No. 98

Cymbeline (Cunobelinus, Kymbelinus), Pendragon, King of the Catuvellauni [98] Tenvantius (Tasclovanus, Tasciovanus) [97] Cassibelanus (Cassivellaunus) [96] Lud (Arianrhod -- daughter of Beli Mawr) [95] Heli (Beli Mawr) [94] Legendary Kings of Britain [75-93] Brutus of Troy [74] Silvius [73] Ascanius [72] Aeneas of Troy (=Creusa; d. of Priam) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] -- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

or

Cymbeline (Cunobelinus, Kymbelinus), Pendragon, King of the Catuvellauni [98] Tenvantius (Tasclovanus, Tasciovanus) [97] Casibelanus (Cassivellaunus, Caswallawn) [96] Lud (Arianrhod -- daughter of Beli Mawr) [95] Beli Mawr (Heli) [94] The Celtic God, Belenus [93] -- Enki (El Elyon) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

It should be noted that Cymbeline’s ancestor, Beli Mawr reigned for ~40 years. Julius Caesar’s British invasion happened in 55-54 BCE... implying that Beli Mawr came into power circa 120 BCE, and thus that he was born circa 140 BCE. He was allegedly the son of the the Celtic God, Belenus... whose lineage apparently went back quite a bit further into ancient history.

According to Wikipedia, Belenus (also Belinus, Belenos, Belinos, Belinu, Belanu, Bellinus, Belus, Bel) was a deity worshipped in Gaul, Britain and the Celtic areas of Austria and Spain. His name means "shining one" or "henbane god" and he is associated with heat and healing.

In other words, he was an unlicensed medical practitioner, and as such he tended to take a lot of heat because of his healing activities. Just kidding. Actually, heat -- specifically hyperthermia -- is in fact a potentially and extremely effective healing methodology. Most diseases (e.g. cancers) are “cold diseases” and things such as high fevers (that tend to very effectively trigger the immune system) can greatly assist in the job of killing off such diseases. It’s not practiced as much in the current modern world simply because it doesn’t cost nearly as much. The rather disastrous alternative has been to avoid fevers by any means and thus miss the opportunity to heal. In other words, the medical profession’s preferences are not really to heal... only to profit from disease.

In fact, from the U. S. National Cancer institute -- as quoted in Wikipedia:

“Hyperthermia therapy is a type of medical treatment in which body tissue is exposed to high temperatures to damage and kill cancer cells or to make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation and certain anti-cancer drugs.

Belenus may be the same deity as Belatu-Cadros. In the Roman period he was identified with Apollo... [because of the healing bit]. His consort was Belisama. In ancient Gaul and Britain, Apollo may have been equated with fifteen or more different Celtic names and epithets (notably Grannos, Borvo, Maponus, Moritasgus and others). The solar or healing implications of Belenus (“the brilliant one or “henbane god”) would have encouraged syncretism with the god Apollo.

The Welsh ancestor-deity Beli Mawr may be derived from Belenus, who is sometimes linked with the Semitic deity Baal*. The legendary king Belinus in Geoffrey of Monmouth's History of the Kings of Britain is probably also derived from this god. (For example, the name, Beli Mawr, is clearly based on Belinus... with “Mawr” being essentially “the Great”.)

[*According to Laurence Gardner [Genesis of the Grail Kings], “the early Canaanite writings determine that Jehovah’s nominal predecessor was the great El Elyon.” (page 24) Furthermore, “the recalcitrant son of El Elyon was Baal.” (page 42) In fact, “the four consonants of the Hebrew stem ‘YHWH’ (which became an eventual acronym for the One God) [actually] represented the four members of the Heavenly Family: Y represented El the Father; H was Ashtoreth the Mother; W corresponded to the Son, Baal, and H was the Daughter, Anath.” (page 111)

[Therefore, it is clear that inasmuch as Apollo was the son of Zeus... that the son Baal/Belinus might also be the son of the King of the Gods. However, the latter is more likely to be Enki, as opposed to Enlil/Jehovah. In truth Enlil and/or Jehovah never exhibited the slightest interest in healing humans of anything (and instead, imposing upon humanity a world of hurts... but not Hertz). Thus it seems likely that Belenus was Baal, the son of Enki/El Elyon.

[Alternatively, again according to Laurence Gardner [Bloodline of the Holy Grail]:

“Beli and Bran are often muddled with the earlier brothers Belinus and Brennus (the sons of Porrex) who contended for power in northern Britain in around 390 BCE, and were regarded as gods in the old Celtic tradition.” (page 182)]

Meanwhile it is worth a momentary digression to check out the plagues of the reign of Lludd Llaw Eraint, "Lludd of the Silver Hand", another son of Beli Mawr, who was king of Britain, while Llefelys was king of France/Gaul. Of particular interest is the bit about Oxford being the “exact centre of the island of Britain”, as well as the battle between the Red and White Dragons. [It’s curious how often different lineages assume the Red and White colors... as opposed to the Red and Blue, or even the Black and Blue... not to mention the Yellow and Lavender.]

Finally...

Cymbeline, Cunobelinus (also written Kynobellinus, sometimes abbreviated to Cunobelin) (late 1st century BCE - 40s CE) was a king in pre-Roman Britain, known primarily from passing mentions by such classical historians as Suetonius and Dio Cassius, and from his many inscribed coins. He appears to have controlled a substantial portion of south-eastern England, and is called "Britannorum rex" ("king of the Britons") by Suetonius. He also appears in British legend as Cynfelyn (Welsh), Kymbelinus (Medieval Brito-Latin) or Cymbeline... the latter name being used in a play by William Shakespeare. His name is a compound made up of cuno- "hound" and "Belenos", (the god) Belenus".

Cunobelinus may have taken power around CE 9 [while Claudius was getting married for the first... consummatable time]. Cunobelinus was instead minting coins from Camulodunum.

Camulodunum is the Roman name for an ancient settlement which claims (for purposes of modern tourism) to be the oldest town in Britain. Existing as a Celtic settlement before the Roman conquest, it became the first Roman town in Britain, and eventually a settlement of discharged Roman soldiers, where its name became Colonia Claudia Victricensis. There is, also, archaeological evidence of a settlement 3,000 years ago (c. 1000 BCE). Its Celtic name was "Camulodunon", meaning "the Fortress of Camulos" (Camulos being a British god equated with the Roman Mars). This name was modified to the Roman spelling of "Camulodunum". [... and if we drop the "unum" (Latin meaning "one"), we arrive at Camulod. From there to Camulot is relatively easy for the hard of hearing interpreters.]

Camulodunon was the capital of the Trinovantes tribe, who built an impressive system of earthwork defenses to the west and south of the town. It was probably established as their capital by Addedomarus, a king circa 25 - 10 BCE.

Cunobelinus appears to be the son of Tasciovanus, a previous king of the Catuvellauni. He may have been emboldened to act against the Trinovantes by the Roman defeat in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest in Germania in CE 9. The Trinovantes were a Roman ally whose independence was protected by a treaty made by Julius Caesar in 54 BCE, but problems in Germania severely discouraged Augustus's territorial ambitions and his ability to defend allies in Britain.

Cunobelinus had three sons, Adminius, Togodumnus [aka Arvirargus] and Caractacus, as well as a brother, Epaticcus. Adminius, judging by his coins, had control of Kent during Cunobelinus' time. Suetonius tells us that c. 40 CE, he was banished from Britain by his father and sought refuge with the emperor Caligula. Caligula treated this appeal by Adminius, as if the entire island had submitted to Rome. Caligula then prepared an invasion of Britain, but abandoned it in farcical circumstances, ordering his soldiers to attack the waves and gather sea shells as booty.

[Another somewhat more detailed version is provided by Wildfire Games.]

Meanwhile, Epaticcus expanded his influence into the territory of the Atrebates in the early 20s CE, first conquering the Atrebatean Retrobates, and then taking the Atrebatan capital Calleva (Silchester) by about 25 CE. He continued to expand his territory until his death in about 35 CE, when Caratacus took over from him and the Atrebates recovered some of their territory.

Caratacus, we will return to, momentarily.

[Meanwhile, it’s probably easy to see why Togodumnus is not mentioned a lot in the more heroic tales of the time... “dummy in a togo” is not the kind of royal name one wants to emulate. Might explain why he might choose to go about as Arvirargus instead. The Roman political spin bureau, on the other hand, would have loved to poke fun... in a time before political cartoons.]

Cunobelinus died some time before 43 CE. Caratacus completed the conquest of the Atrebates, and their king, Verica, also fled to Rome, providing the new emperor, Claudius, with a pretext for the conquest of Britain. Caratacus and Arvirargus led the initial resistance to that invasion.

 

Generation No. 99

1. King Gwenivyth (Arvirargus of Siluria) [99] Cymbeline (Kimbelinus) [98] Tenvantius (Tasclovanus, Tasciovanus) [97] Cassibelanus (Cassivellaunus) [96] Lud (Arianrhod -- daughter of Beli Mawr) [95] Heli (Beli Mawr) [94] Legendary Kings of Britain [75-93] Brutus of Troy [74] Silvius [73] Ascanius [72] Aeneas of Troy (=Creusa; d. of Priam) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] -- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

Arvirargus (or Arvirargus; Togodumnus) was a British king of the 1st century CE, and a contemporary of the emperor Claudius (r. 41-54 CE). Arvirargus was a son of the former king Kimbelinus. He succeeded to the throne of Britain after his elder brother, Guiderius [Caractacus -- See Laurence Gardner or Robert Graves] was vanquished by the invading Romans under Claudius. Arvirargus had actually put on his brother's armour and led the army of the Britons against the Romans. [He may have fooled a fair number of warriors with this ruse... and thus the battle continued unabated. Then when Arvirargus learned that Claudius and his commander, Hamo, have fled into the woods, he followed them until they reached the coast. The Britons managed to kill Hamo as he tried to flee onto a ship. Curiously enough, the place is named Southampton after him. [Weird.] Meanwhile, Claudius was able to regroup his troops elsewhere and he later besieged Portchester until it fell to his forces.

Following Hamo's death, Arvirargus sought refuge at Winchester, but Claudius followed him there with his army. The Britons broke the siege and attacked the Romans, but Claudius halted the attack and offered a treaty. In exchange for peace and tribute with Rome, Claudius offered Arvirargus his own daughter in marriage. They accepted each other's terms and thereafter Arvirargus aided Claudius’ continuing campaign in Britain in subduing other rebellious forces.

In the following spring, Arvirargus wed Claudius' daughter, Genvissa (Genuissa) Venus Julia Claudia, and promptly named the city of Gloucester after her father. Thereafter, Claudius left Britain in the control of Arvirargus, who in the years following, rebuilt the cities that had been ruined. Unfortunately, Arvirargus eventually became feared by his neighbours. The unrest prompted him to halt his tribute to Rome. This, in turn, forced Claudius to send Vespasian with an army to Britain to pick up the back pay. As Vespasian prepared to land, such a large British force stood ready to repel the invaders that Vespasian had to flee to another port, Totnes, where he set up camp.

Once a base was established, he marched to Exeter and besieged the city. Arvirargus met him in battle there and the fight was soon stalemated. The following morning, Queen Genvissa (Claudius’ daughter) mediated peace between the two foes. Vespasian returned to Rome and Arvirargus ruled the country peacefully for many years. When he finally died, he was buried in Gloucester, the city he built with Claudius. He was succeeded by his son, Marius. (King of Siluria). The Arvirargus/Genuissa marriage had clearly survived the ages.

 

2. Genuissa (Venus Julia) Claudia [99] CLAUDIUS [1-98]

Genuissa (Venus Julia) Claudia was one of five natural children of Emperor Claudius. On the one hand, according to J. C. Marler:

“...everything that can be known about Genuissa (aka Venissa or Venus Julia) is to be found in Geoffrey of Monmouth, the 12th century British chronicler who wrote the Historia regum Brittaniae.

“Neither Tacitus, Suetonius, nor Dio Cassius, the Roman historians, have anything at all to say about Genuissa. But Griscom, in his lengthy introduction to the Historia, is much concerned to defend Geoffey's credibility. And, if Geoffrey, who relied upon sources to which we may not now have access, can be believed, then grounds may exist for saying that Genuissa was the daughter of Claudius and the spouse of Arvirargus. Thorpe agrees with Griscom that, on the whole, Geoffrey is likely to be something better than a fabulist.”

Marler goes on to quote the relevant passage: [c. CE 43-45]

“Modern English translation of the above passage, as given in Geoffey of Monmouth, The History of the Kings of Britain, trans. Lewis Thorpe (London: 1966), p. 121:

He (Claudius) therefore proposed peace to him (Arvirargus), promising to give him his own daughter, if only he would recognize that the kingdom of Britain was under the sway of Rome. His nobles persuaded Arvirargus to abandon his plans for battle and to accept the proposals of Claudius. Their argument was that it could be no disgrace for him to submit to the Romans, since they were the acknowledged overlords of the whole world. Arvirargus was swayed by these arguments and by others of a similar nature. He accepted their advice and submitted to Claudius. Claudius soon sent to Rome for his daughter. With the help of Arvirargus he subdued the Orkneys and the other islands in that neighbourhood.

“At the end of that winter the messengers returned with Claudius' daughter and handed her over to her father. The girl's name was Genvissa (= Genuissa). Her beauty was such that everyone who saw her was filled with admiration. Once she had been united with him in lawful marriage, she inflamed the King with such burning passion that he preferred her company to anything else in the world. As a result of this Arvirargus made up his mind to give some special mark of distinction to the place where he had married her. He suggested to Claudius that the two of them should found there a city which should perpetuate in times to come the memory of so happy a marriage. Claudius agreed and ordered a town to be built which should be called Kaerglou or Gloucester. Down to our own day it retains its site on the bank of the Severn, between Wales and Loegria. Some, however, say that it took its name from Duke Gloius, whom Claudius fathered in that city and to whom he granted control of the duchy of the Welsh after Arvirargus.” [emphasis added]

Other scholars, such as Laurence Gardner (Bloodline of the Holy Grail... page 409), have identified Genuissa as the daughter of Claudius, even while disagreeing with the identity of Genuissa’s mother. Gardner assumes that Genuissa’s mother is Valeria Messalina, while e-family tree assumes the mother is Aemilia Lepida (daughter of Lucius Paulius and Vispania Julia, and second wife of Claudius) and Ancestry.com's Rootsweb argues for Julia Agrippina (Agrippina the Younger, daughter of Germanicus and Vipsania Agrippina, and fourth wife of Claudius).

Wikipedia, meanwhile, totally discounts the historical nature of Genuissa (aka Venissa)... but said discounting is apparently based on her absence in the annals of what Wikipedia refers to as “authentic Roman history”. In general, this means histories by Tacitus (a senator and historian of the Roman Empire, AD 56-117), Suetonius (an equestrian and a historian during the Roman Empire), and Dio Cassius (a Roman consul and noted historian). Obviously.. each of these historians were clearly not immune to the politics and political pressures of the time.

In fact, if there was any attempt to heighten the fame of an alleged barbarian like Arvirargus, the idea of a Roman Emperor’s daughter being the playmate of such a man might well have colored the recalled and recorded history. All three of these historians, for example, did their work some time after Genuissa’s time in the sun (and/or the English fog), and thus may not have been loath to drop a name here or there. Juvenal, the 2nd century (CE) Roman satirist, for example, likened Arvirargus to a barbaric animal. Barbaric animals do not in general marry the daughters of Roman Emperors. It just isn't done.

Furthermore, Wikipedia’s reliance upon what it styles “authentic Roman history”, should not be used to discredit what is clearly a history of the Britons. In fact, Wikipedia notes elsewhere that said “authentic Roman history” by the TS&D triumvirate is contradictory and even fantastical, for example, in attempting to account for Agrippina the Younger’s death. Thus any reliance upon the traditional historians, and in defiance of a British history is not exactly to Wikipedia’s credit.

In order to accurately identify Genuissa and her parentage, we can note, for example, that:

Plautia Urgulanilla married Claudius in 9 CE (Claudius was 18 years old at the time)
Aelia Paetina married Claudius in 28 CE. (Claudius was 37 years old at the time)
Valeria Messalina married Claudius in 38 CE (Claudius was 48 years old at the time)
Agrippina the Younger married Claudius in 49 CE (when Claudius was 58 years old)

[We are discounting for the moment, Claudius’ first wife, who died on the day of their wedding. It would appear that there were no little Claudians springing from that ill-fated marriage.]

Everyone also agrees that Claudius was in Britain 44 CE (e.g., Robert Graves in his book, Claudius the God) and that furthermore, Genuissa was not delivered to her groom, Arvirargus, until the following year, 45 CE). In this case, certain possibilities can be safely eliminated. One, Genuissa cannot be the daughter of Claudius and Agrippina the Younger (as their marriage was after 45 CE). Messalina is also ruled out, in that Genuissa would have been, at best, about six years old... not exactly someone for whom King Arvirargus would likely have developed a huge passion. Three, if Aelia Paetina was Genuissa’s mother, Genuissa would have had to be born circa 29 CE... just prior to Claudia Antonia being born to Aelia Paetina in 30 CE. This is unlikely, even though Genuissa by way of Aelia would have thus been 15 years old in 45 CE. If born after Claudia Antonia, Genuissa would have been about 12 years old or younger in 45 CE. Finally, Britannicus was born to Messalina 3 years after her marriage to Claudius, suggesting that a birth within the first year was probably not something a rather prudish Roman society would find appealing.

This leaves, for purposes of a legitimate daughter, only Plautia Urgulanilla, Claudius’ first wife (whom he married when he was 18 years old). Plautia did, in fact, give birth to a daughter, Claudia, in 24 or 25 CE, several months after Claudius had divorced Plautia. In 45 CE, this Claudia would have been ~20 years old... just right for Arvirargus to become quite inflamed by someone whose name included “Venus” as an added inducement to diplomatic, royal marriages.

In 24 CE, Imperial Rome was a hot bed of ambitious people fighting tooth and nail for power, survival, and family status... all in an atmosphere of no holds (poisons, knives, weapons of any kind) barred... a paradigm not unlike the Congress at the beginning of the 21st Century CE. Claudius was, of course, very much aware of the intrigue and potential for death for anyone near the pinnacles of power. In fact, his early physical and apparently mental problems -- which seemed to have waned as he aged -- had nevertheless been to his advantage in the form of an extremely good cover for him in avoiding the nightmares and nightknives, poisons, and so forth.

Meanwhile, Plautia and Claudius’ first child, a son, had died young for either unknown reasons, or possibly asphyxiation (smothering, choking, and so forth... i.e., quite possibly murder). With a second child on the way... and with the pretext afforded by Plautia’s possible involvement in the death of her grandson Silvanus’ new wife, Apronia... Claudius might well have seized the unique opportunity to preserve his seed for future generations.

In the case of Apronia’s death, it is worth noting that Emperor Tiberious came to personally investigate the crime scene himself. Not only was Silvanus implicated, but Plautia‘s grandmother (perhaps at Livia’s behest) sent her grandson a dagger with which to kill himself in an honorable fashion. Prior to any trial, Silvanus did the “proper” Roman thing, and killed himself. Because of the ensuing scandal, Plautia’s connection with the imperial family was quickly severed, and she was, according to Wikipedia, “understandably not written of again after these events”. In a similar fashion, her so-called illegitimate daughter Claudia (illegitimate because Claudius divorced the mother and repudiated the child) was also never heard of again. Claudius had in fact gone to the extreme of disowning (repudiating) the infant Claudia, and pointing the genetic finger at another man... one without the slightest pretensions to imperial power. Claudius' repudiation was, in effect, a gesture of love toward Claudia... in the form of protection.

How better to protect both the mother and daughter from a hoarde of assassins than to allow everyone to believe that Claudia (Genuissa) was nothing more than the illegitimate daughter of the freedman Boter? Born in 24-25 CE, Claudia could have been quickly hidden away in... oh... for example, Genoa (thus the appellation of Genuissa). Instead of Claudia, she would grow up under another name, Genuissa, and would have supposedly another man as her father, a mere Freedman. Claudia/Genuissa would thereby no longer represent any threat to anyone in power... nor, more importantly, could she be used as a pawn in the power struggles by being married off appropriately.

Furthermore, in addition to Claudius’ clear perception of the dangers of Roman style power politics, so was Urgulanilla’s grandmother, Urguiania, who was a close friend of Livia (Augustus’ wife and the penultimate power broker). Urguiania and Livia would know from first hand experience all about intrigue and how to stay alive in Rome (i.e., play dead, pose as illegitimate or disowned). Pure and simple this charade would keep Claudia (Genuissa) safe. If Urgulanilla’s son (who preceded Claudia) had indeed died from less than natural causes, there would have been a clear motivation to take radical steps in order to protect Genuissa. Livia, meanwhile, died in 29 CE, and Genuissa grew up without hindrance.

Claudius might well have found that the idea of his seed (and his extended family’s seed) being wiped out to be less than a perfect scenario. And while in his later years, he had high hopes that his natural son, Britannicus, might follow him on the throne... this was only after Claudia had been married off to Arvirargus. That dye had already been cast. As for his adopting Nero as a son and co-heir apparent, Claudius was probably spending most of his time trying to stay alive and not at the mercy of his wife and Nero’s mother, Agrippina the Younger.

Claudius’ actions at the time of Claudia's birth would not necessarily have been his preference. But it was clearly the best choice in an paradigm where Emperor Tiberius was rapidly showing signs of insanity. Claudius was still flying under the radar net... trying diligently to avoid the appearance of a threat to any other heir apparent. There is also the possibility that having married Plautia Urgulanilla at the tender age of 18, the two might have gotten along quite well... neither having become as jaded and coarse as they might have in later years. Claudius could easily have wanted to save both his wife of 15 years, and their infant daughter Claudia (Genuissa) from the likes of Tiberius, Sejanus... and later Caligula (the latter representing Rome’s entry into the sport of Most Insane in the new Roman style Olympic Games).

By the time Claudius had become emperor on January 24, 41 CE, Claudia would have been 16 years old (and thus prime fodder for assassins... as would be shown in the case of Britannicus, who was murdered mere months before his ascension into manhood). In becoming emperor, Claudius was always under threats from the Senate and ambitious Romans. Only three years after becoming Emperor, Claudius was in Britain, and it may have been there when he saw a really good opportunity to ensure that his seed made it to the future. The fact of the matter is that hunting season on the Julio Claudians was coming to a close, inasmuch as they were rapidly running out of family members to assassinate.

There is of course the possibility that Claudius offering his “daughter” Genuissa to Arvirargus would have prompted a few Roman raised eyebrows (and/or societal outrage), once the word slash gossip had flown back to Rome at near instantaneous speeds. (No news travels as fast as bad news... the latter often exceeding the speed of light.) For example, Wikipedia discounts the historical legitimacy of Genuissa for this very reason:

"Venissa cannot be considered historical. She is not mentioned in authentic Roman history; her supposed husband Arvirargus is known only from a cryptic reference in a second century satirical poem by Juvenal; and it is in any case inconceivable that a daughter, even an illegitimate daughter, of a Roman emperor could be given in marriage to a barbarian without attracting comment." [emphasis added]

In the event of such propriety-breaking scandal, Claudius could have easily countered that what King Arvirargus didn’t know wouldn’t hurt him... and that the exceptionally attractive Genuissa could have been a minor aristocrat for purposes of “authentic Roman history”. Calling her his daughter had simply been a brilliantly innovative political maneuver to make the peace all that more permanent. That in itself was probably worth a Triumph for Claudius upon his return... even more than the mere subjugation of Britain.

The sad part, of course, is that what is known about Genuissa [other than the name of her son: King Meric (Marius Cylin) of Siluria] is pretty much limited to the description quoted above... albeit with the obvious emphasis on her exceptional beauty. The latter might well have accounted for the unusual appearance of her Venus as her “middle name”.

If on the other hand... stand by for some serious speculation... if Genuissa’s middle name of Venus derived from Claudius having a child by the goddess Venus... then that would also compute. It would also explain why the patriarchal “authentic Roman history” writers would have fled from that particular scene faster than a psychotic mongoose pursuing a garden snake. This latter conjecture is probably not correct... but it is just barely plausible. And inasmuch as the truth if often stranger than fiction... it still might make for some good copy.

Additional Dead End Generations

Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (CALIGULA) [99] Germanicus (=Agrippina the Elder) [98] Drusus the Elder (=Antonia Minor) [97] Livia Drusilla Augusta (=Tiberius Nero I) [96] Marcus Livius Drusus Claudianus (=Aufidia) [95] ... Appius Claudius Pulcher (c. 212 BC) [?] Consul and Dictator Appius Claudius Caecus (“the blind”; c. 340-273 BC) [?] Dictator Gaius Claudius Crassus (c. 337 BC) [?] ...unknown

or

Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (CALIGULA) [99] Agrippina the Elder (=Germanicus) [98] Julia the Elder (=Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa) [97] Augustus (=Scribonia; des. Pompey and dictator Lucius Cornelius Sulla) [96] Atia Balba Caesonia (=Gaius Octavius) [95] Julia Caesaris (=Marcus Atius Balbus) [94] Gaius Julius Caesar III (=Aurelia Cotta) [93] Marcia Regia (=Gaius Julius Caesar II) [92] Quintus Marcius Rex [91] Two teenage sons [90] Ancus Marcius [89] Pompilia [88] Numa Pompilius (or daughter of Romulus) [87] Romulus (=Hersilla) [86] Rhea Silvia [85] Numitor [84] Procas [83] Aventinus [82] Romulus Silvius [81] Agrippa [80] Tibernius Silvius [79] Capetus [78] Capys [77] Atys [76] Alba [75] Latinus Silvius [74] Aeneas Silvius [73] Silvius (I) [72] Aeneas (=Lavinia) [71] Anchises (=Inanna) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] ---- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

or

Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (CALIGULA) [99] Germanicus (=Agrippina the Elder) [98] Antonia Minor (=Drusus the Elder) [97] Octavia Minor (=Marcus Antonius, aka Mark Antony) [96] Atia Balba Caesonia (=Gaius Octavius) [95] Julia Caesaris (=Marcus Atius Balbus) [94] Gaius Julius Caesar III (=Aurelia Cotta) [93] Marcia Regia (=Gaius Julius Caesar II) [92] Quintus Marcius Rex [91] Two teenage sons [90] Ancus Marcius [89] Pompilia [88] Numa Pompilius [87] Romulus [86] Rhea Silvia [85] Numitor [84] Procas [83] Aventinus [82] Romulus Silvius [81] Agrippa [80] Tibernius Silvius [79] Capetus [78] Capys [77] Atys [76] Alba [75] Latinus Silvius [74] Aeneas Silvius [73] Silvius (I) [72] Aeneas (=Lavinia) [71] Anchises (=Inanna) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] ---- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

[You’d think with such a heritage that Caligula would have been just slightly less insane.]

Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (31 August 12 – 24 January 41), more commonly known by his cognomen CALIGULA, was the third Roman Emperor, reigning from 16 March 37 until his assassination on 24 January 41. Caligula's father, Germanicus, the nephew and adopted son of emperor Tiberius, was a very successful general and one of Rome's most beloved public figures. His son, the young Gaius, earned his nickname Caligula (the diminutive form of caliga) meaning "little [soldier's] boot", while accompanying his father on military campaigns in Germania. When Germanicus died in Antioch in CE 19, his mother Agrippina the Elder returned to Rome with her six children, where she became entangled in an increasingly bitter feud with Tiberius. This conflict eventually led to the destruction of her family, with Caligula as the sole male survivor. Unscathed by the deadly intrigues, and seemingly unmoved by the fate of his closest relatives, Caligula accepted the invitation to join the emperor on the island of Capri in CE 31, where Tiberius himself had withdrawn in CE 26. At the death of Tiberius, on 16 March CE 37, Caligula succeeded his great-uncle and adoptive grandfather... very likely the means whereby the by now demented Tiberius could give Rome the bird one last time.

Surprisingly enough, Caligula, in the first two years of his reign, has been described as a noble and moderate ruler. However, after the imperial honeymoon, all such historical descriptions focused upon his cruelty, extravagance, and sexual perversity, presenting him as an insane tyrant. While the reliability of these histories has been difficult to assess, what is known is that during his brief reign, Caligula worked to increase the authority of the princeps, possibly contemplating the introduction of an authoritarian system of an eastern type. He directed much of his attention to ambitious construction projects, notoriously luxurious dwellings for himself, but also two new aqueducts for the city of Rome (Aqua Claudia and Anio Novus). Interestingly the latter projects are now primarily associated with his successor, Claudius, who brought them to completion. Caligula also annexed Mauretania, and brought to Rome from Egypt the Vatican Obelisk... which became the centerpiece of a large racetrack that Caligula built. The fact that it is now the Vatican Obelisk, but formerly a racetrack centerpiece, is just one more of those marvelous Roman ironies.

On 24 January AD 41, Caligula was assassinated as the result of a conspiracy involving officers of the Praetorian Guard as well as members of the Roman Senate and of the imperial court. The conspirators' attempt to use the opportunity to restore the Roman Republic was thwarted, however, as on that same day the Praetorian Guard declared Caligula's uncle, Claudius, emperor in Caligula’s place. Even soldiers sometimes get into politics. They have these swords, you see.

According to Will Durant [Caesar and Christ, Simon & Schuster, New York, 1944, page 268]:

“When the news went out [of Caligula’s death], the city hesitated to believe it; men feared that this was a trick of the imperial prankster to find out who would rejoice at his death. To clarify the issue the assassins killed Caligula’s final wife and dashed out his daughter’s brains against a wall. On that day, says Dio, Caligula learned that he was not a god.”

Also, see Caligula’s ancestry at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caligula.

 

And just to finish up with the Imperial Roman connection:

Tiberius Claudius NERO [100] Agrippina the Younger (= Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus) [99] Agrippina the Elder (=Germanicus) [98] Julia the Elder (=Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa) [97] Augustus (=Scribonia; des. Pompey and dictator Lucius Cornelius Sulla) [96] Atia Balba Caesonia (=Gaius Octavius) [95] Julia Caesaris (=Marcus Atius Balbus) [94] Gaius Julius Caesar III (=Aurelia Cotta) [93] Marcia Regia (=Gaius Julius Caesar II) [92] Quintus Marcius Rex [91] Two teenage sons [90] Ancus Marcius [89] Pompilia [88] Numa Pompilius [87] Romulus [86] Rhea Silvia [85] Numitor [84] Procas [83] Aventinus [82] Romulus Silvius [81] Agrippa [80] Tibernius Silvius [79] Capetus [78] Capys [77] Atys [76] Alba [75] Latinus Silvius [74] Aeneas Silvius [73] Silvius (I) [72] Aeneas (=Lavinia) [71] Anchises (=Inanna) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] ---- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

NERO Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (15 December CE 37 – 9 June 68), born Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, also called Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was the fifth and last Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Nero was adopted by his great uncle Claudius to become heir to the throne. As Nero Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus, he succeeded to the throne on 13 October 54, following Claudius's death. He was born in Antium, near Rome, the only son of Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus and Agrippina the Younger, sister of emperor Caligula. [Never trust someone whose name as Bar Bus in it... or even Super Bus... or worse yet, Super Bar Bus. The latter sounds a bit too much like something you'd take to the Super Bowl... and thereafter pretty much miss the game.]

Gnaeus was a grandson to Mark Antony and Octavia Minor through their daughters Antonia Major and Antonia Minor, by each parent. (For the most part, however, he tended to play in minor keys.) Via Octavia, Gnaeus was the grandnephew of Augustus. He had been employed as a praetor and was a member of Caligula's staff when the latter traveled to the East. He was, however, described by Suetonius as a murderer and a cheat, who was subsequently charged by emperor Tiberius with treason, adultery, and incest. [The incest charge is somewhat akin [pardon the pun] to being ludicrous, in that the Julio-Claudian dynasty was almost predominantly incestuous.] Fortunately for Gnaeus, Tiberius died before any retribution could be enacted, thus allowing Nero’s father to escape the charges. Gnaeus died of edema (or "dropsy") in 39 CE when Nero was three.

Nero’s mother was Agrippina the Younger, who was great-granddaughter to Augustus and his wife Scribonia through their daughter Julia the Elder and her husband Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa. Agrippina the Younger's father, Germanicus, was grandson to Augustus's wife, Livia, on one side and to Mark Antony and Octavia on the other. Germanicus' mother Antonia Minor, was a daughter of Octavia Minor and Mark Antony. Octavia was Augustus' second elder sister. Germanicus was also the adoptive son of Tiberius.

Nero ruled from CE 54 to 68, focusing much of his attention on diplomacy, trade, and increasing the cultural capital of the empire. He ordered the building of theaters and promoted athletic games. His reign included a successful war and a negotiated peace with the Parthian Empire (58–63), the suppression of the British revolt (60–61), and improving relations with Greece. The First Roman-Jewish War (66–70) started during his reign. In 68 a military coup drove Nero from the throne. Facing assassination, he committed suicide on 9 June 68.

Nero's rule is often associated with tyranny and extravagance. He is known for a number of executions, including those of his mother [despite her endless plotting in putting him on the throne... kids are so ungrateful]. He also killed his stepbrother, Britannicus. And on top of everything else Nero was an early [get them while they last] persecutor of Christians. Finally, Nero is known as the emperor who "fiddled while Rome burned". This latter view is based upon the ‘authentic Roman sources’, i.e., Tacitus, Suetonius and Cassius Dio. Still, it must be admitted that few surviving sources of any kind paint Nero in a favorable light. Some, including those mentioned above, do manage to portray him as an emperor who was popular with the common Roman people, especially in the East. Nevertheless, the study of Nero is problematic as some modern historians question the reliability of ancient sources when reporting on Nero's tyrannical acts. [Wow! As if some historians had an axe to grind? Probably the one used to decapitate some near- or distant-relative.]

 

Meanwhile, back in Britannia, the Claudian legacy is running wild. For perspective, consider Figure 1.

Figure 1 -- Dardanus, Claudius, and the Fisher Kings

Claudius

Generation No. 100

1. King Marius of Siluria [100] Genuissa Venus Julia Claudia (=King Arvirargus of Siluria... and the long line of the Kings of Briton, back to Troy and Dardanus) [99] Claudius (=Plautia Urgulanilla) [98] CLAUDIUS [1-97]

or

1. King Marius of Siluria [100] Arvirargus (=Genuissa Venus Julia Claudia) [99] Cymbeline (Kimbelinus) [98] Tenvantius (Tasclovanus, Tasciovanus) [97] Cassibelanus (Cassivellaunus) [96] Lud (Arianrhod -- daughter of Beli Mawr) [95] Heli (Beli Mawr) [94] Legendary Kings of Britain [75-93] Brutus of Troy [74] Silvius [73] Ascanius [72] Aeneas of Troy (=Creusa; d. of Priam) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65]

King Marius of Siluria (74-125 CE) was a king of the Britons during the time of the Roman occupation of Britain (as recounted in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae). He was the son of King Arvirargus and ruled following his father's death.

Married: Penardian (Penardun), great grand daughter of Mary and Joseph

Children
King Cole I
Eugein

According to Geoffrey (as reported by Wikipedia), King Marius ruled wisely in the time when the Picts first came to Britain. A fleet of ships under the leadership of Sodric came from Scythia and landed in Albany. Once there, they began to destroy the lands and Marius was forced to react. Following numerous battles, Marius killed Sodric and set up a stone there to remember that triumph. In addition, that land became known as Westmorland after him. In respect for the people he defeated, he gave them a small portion of Albany called Caithness to live in. Marius refused, however, to give them women to marry so the Picts fled to Ireland and took wives there.

[The From Scythia With Love connection is quite important in that King Antenor and the Cimmenans of Scythia on the Black Sea were Trojan Royal Descendants, and after 24 intervening generations, Marcomer (ostensibly a Scythian) would marry King Marius’ grand-daughter, Athildis of Camulod, the elder sister of Lleiffer Mawr (King Lucius).]

Marius established close ties with Rome and good diplomacy through tribute and respect of the Roman citizens in Britain. He was, after all, the son of Genuissa, Claudius’ daughter. Marius is reported to have followed the laws of his ancestors and ruled justly. His queen, Penardian, very likely also figured prominently in this rule... and her stock from Mary and Joseph, James the Just (Joseph of Arimathea), Anna and Bran the Blessed almost certainly contributed to her character. (See below.)

When King Marius died, he was succeeded by his son, Coilus (King Coel I of Camu-lot).

The royal players in Britain in the first two hundred years of the Current Era have some surprisingly sterling reputations. The royalty of the time -- see the lower half of Figure 1 and the upper portion of Figure 2 (see below) -- was composed of an astounding collection of truly royal personages... those with the lineages that were to die for... and in fact said lineages often caused many a death. In the midst of their time in the English fog, it just so happened that they tended to hang out places called Camu-lot, Avalon, and Glastonbury... among others. We are in fact talking about a wondrous time... or more likely... a time with a wondrous reputation, at least from the viewpoint of subsequent generations. Furthermore, if we look a bit into the future, we will likely find that King Arthur very likely spent little if any time in a place called Camulot... or even Avalon. But when you're creating a myth of astounding proportions, a little mixing and matching is unlikely to do much harm... and in fact is dictated by entertainment values. Thus an historical King Arthur, with an impressive historical presence, might well deserve -- in a bard's relating of events -- a really nifty set or location (with or without special effects)... along with some very dramatic tweakings or slight additions to the legend. In effect, what we have here is that Camulot existed... even if it was not quite in its most glorious conditions when King Arthur finally arrived on the scene with his own troop of players... and who would be acting in their own personal play.

 

Figure 2 -- Mary's Tree

Mary and Jesus

2. Penardian [100] Bran the Blessed (=Anna Enygeus) [96] King Llyr (Lear) of the Britons [95] Beli Mawr [94] Legendary Kings of Britain [75-93] Brutus of Troy [74] Silvius [73] Ascanius [72] Aeneas of Troy (=Creusa; d. of Priam) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] -- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

or

2. Penardian [100] Anna (Enygeus) (=Bran the Blessed, Archdruid of Siluria and son of King Llyr of the Britons) [99] James the Just (Joseph of Arimethea) (=Anna, daughter of Lazarus and Salome) [98] Mary (=Joseph) [91-96] Hannah (=Joachim; son of Matthat the Zadok (=Sabartia); son of Eleazer the Zadok) [90] Estha (=Joiadah) [89] Eleazer the Zadok (=Hayat) [88] Eliud [87] Achim [86] Sadoc [85] Azor [84] Eliakim [83] Abard [82] Zorobabbel [81] Hadast (=Shealtiel/Pedaiah) [80] Neri (Shealtiel’s guardian and Hadast’s father) [79] Melchi [78] Addi [77] Cosam [76] Elmodam [75] Er [74] Jose [73] Jorim [72] Matthat [71] (space to conform to senior line) [70] Levi [69] Semel [68] Juda [67] Joseph [66] Eliakim [65] Menan [64] Mattatha [63] Nathan [62] King David (=Bathsheba) [61] Jesse (=Habliar) [60] Obed (=Abalit) [59] Boaz (=Ruth) [58] Missing Generations [55-57] Salma (=Rachab) [54] Nashon (=Simar) [53] Aminadab (=Thehara) [52] Kiya-tasherit (=Ram) [51] Akhenaten (Moses) (=Mery-kiya, Miriam) [50] Amenhotep III (=Tiye) [49] Tuthmosis IV (=Mutemwiya) [48] Amenhotep II (=Tiaa) [47] Tuthmosis III (=Meryetre-Hatshepsut) [46] Tuthmosis II (=Iset) [45] Tuthmosis I (=Mutnofret) [44] Amenhotep I (=Ahmose-Meritamon) [43] Ahmose I (=Ahmose-Nefertari) [42] Missing Generations [33 - 41] Amenemhet IV (=Sobeknefru, d. of Igrath) [32] Amenemhet III (=Aat) [31] Senusret III (=Mereret) [30] Senusret II (=Nofret) [29] Amenemhet II (=Keminebu) [28] Senusret I (=Nefru) [27] Tohwait (=Amenemhet I) [26] Nefert (=Senusret of Elephantine) [25] Missing Generations [15-24] Ham (=Neelata-mek) [14] Tubal Cain (=Nin-banda) [13] Lamech (=Zillah) [12] Methusael (=Edna?) [11] Mehujael (=?) [10] Irad (=Baraka?) [9] Enoch (=Edna?) [8] Cain (=Luluwa) [7] Enki and Eve [6] Enki and Nin-khursag [5] Anu and Antu (OR Ki) [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

Penardian (Penardun), among other attributes, has a family tree which is more than sufficiently suitable for such an exalted position as that of a Commander for the truly noteworthy, Queen Boudicca. On the one hand, Penardian combines the Legendary Kings of Britain with the Hebrew lineage of no less than James the Just, the son of Mary and Joseph. Then by marrying King Marius of Siluria... suddenly in southern Britain... the long lineages of Dardanus, the Trojans, and the imperial families of Rome (via Claudius) weds Penardian’s already impressive family tree to yield King Coel I, whose lineage is even more astoundingly impressive.

The key, of course, was when Anna Enygeus linked the Britons (and thus the Trojans, and Dardanus) to the Mary and Joseph line, by marring Bran the Blessed, Archdruid of Siluria. Anna and Bran’s grandchild, King Coel I, can now be considered to not only include all above, but also the Felonius Families of Imperial Rome. There is now only the dramatic resolution of all of these royal lines with the Mary Magdalene and Jesus line... now only a mere four generations away... to really make one's day. In that regard, the name to remember is Catheloys, son of Aminadab and Eurgen.

Penardian is sometimes referred to in some genealogies as Victoria... possibly in deference to the partiality of Queen Victoria of the 19th Century CE to have her portraits in the style of Queen Boudicca.

Meanwhile, according to Wikipedia:

Boudicca (d. CE 60 or 61) was a queen of the Brittonic Iceni tribe of what is now known as East Anglia in England, who led an uprising of the tribes against the occupying forces of the Roman Empire. Boudicca's husband, Prasutagus, an Icenian king who had ruled as a nominally independent ally of Rome, left his kingdom jointly to his daughters and the Roman Emperor in his will. However, when he died his will was ignored.

[This sort of thing happens a lot. Where there’s a will... there’s always a lot of controversy, lawsuits, rebellions, and so forth. Roman law was... and continues to this day... to pretty much ignore the rights of non-Romans and those of other allegiances.]

From the Roman point of view, the kingdom was annexed as if conquered, Boudicca was flogged and her daughters raped, and the Roman financiers called in their loans.

[The latter also happens quite regularly... even today. I.e., never trust a banker.]

Later, while the Roman governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, was leading a campaign on the island of Anglesey in north Wales, Boudicca led the Iceni, along with the Trinovantes and others, in revolt. They destroyed Camulodunum (Colchester), formerly the capital of the Trinovantes, but now a colonia (a settlement for discharged Roman soldiers) and the site of a temple to the former emperor Claudius, which was built and maintained at local expense. [The latter seems only fair.] They also routed a Roman legion, the IX Hispana, sent to relieve the settlement. Reportedly, Boudicca was famous for her war-cry ‘Y gwir erbyn y Byd.’ [Okay... in English, it means “The Truth Against the World”... and which in Pax Romana meant “I think we can safely ignore this one.”]

Curiously, “it was immediately after this that Joseph of Arimethea came from Gaul to set up his Glastonbury church in the face of Roman imperialism.” [Laurence Gardner, Bloodline of the Holy Grail, page 183]

On hearing the news of the revolt, Suetonius hurried to Londinium (London), the twenty-year-old commercial settlement that was the rebels' next target. Concluding he did not have the numbers to defend it, Suetonius evacuated and abandoned it. [In the US Marine tradition, he decided to “advance in the other direction.”] The settlement was burnt to the ground, as was Verulamium (St Albans). An estimated 70,000–80,000 people were killed in the three cities... though the figures are suspect -- primarily because all of the history was being written by the Romans, Suetonius, et al. Spin and revisionist history has a long and glorious... past. Suetonius, meanwhile, [heroically] regrouped his forces in the West Midlands, and despite being heavily outnumbered [assuming one counts the trees and large rocks arrayed against him], defeated Boudicca in the Battle of Watling Street. [A battle involving thousands on a... street? Okay... it's a pretty long street.] The crisis caused the emperor Nero to consider withdrawing all Roman forces from the island, but Suetonius' eventual victory over Boudicca secured Roman control of the province. Boudicca then poisoned herself so she would not be captured... or so it was reported by the Roman historians. Keep in mind that they would never flinch from creative fictional accounts.

Tacitus and Dio did agree, however, that Boudicca was of royal descent. Dio says that she was "possessed of greater intelligence than often belongs to women" [a hint of male chauvinism somewhere in there], that she was tall, had long red hair down to her hips, a harsh voice and a piercing glare, and habitually wore a large golden necklace (perhaps a torc), a many-coloured tunic, and a thick cloak fastened by a brooch."

[See, for example, Peter Robson's version of Boudicca in his Truth Against the World.]

There are additional individuals in Generations No. 100 - 103, but these are included in the

Mary Magdalene and Jesus lines of descent... following this grouping of lineages.

 

Generation No. 101

1. King Coel I (Coilus) [101] Marius of Siluria (=Penardian) [100] Arvirargus (=Genuissa Venus Julia Claudia) [99] Cymbeline (Kimbelinus) [98] Tenvantius (Tasclovanus, Tasciovanus) [97] Cassibelanus (Cassivellaunus) [96] Lud (Arianrhod -- daughter of Beli Mawr) [95] Heli (Beli Mawr) [94] Legendary Kings of Britain [75-93] Brutus of Troy [74] Silvius [73] Ascanius [72] Aeneas of Troy (=Creusa; d. of Priam) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] -- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

or

1. King Coel I (Coilus) [101] Marius of Siluria (=Penardian) [100] Genuissa Venus Julia Claudia (=Arvirargus) [99] Claudius (=Plautia Urgulanilla) [98] CLAUDIUS [1-97]

or

1. King Coel I (Coilus) [101] Penardian (=Marius of Siluria) [100] Bran the Blessed (=Anna Enygeus) [96] King Llyr (Lear) of the Britons (=Penardian) [95] Beli Mawr [94] Legendary Kings of Britain [75-93] Brutus of Troy [74] Silvius [73] Ascanius [72] Aeneas of Troy (=Creusa; d. of Priam) [70] Capys (=Themiste) [69] Assaracus (=Aigesta) [68] Tros (=Callirrhoe; or Acallaris) [67] Erichthonius (=Astyoche) [66] Dardanus (=Batea) [65] -- Enki (=Electra) [5] Anu and Antu [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

or

1. King Coel I (Coilus) [101] Penardian (=Marius of Siluria) [100] Anna Enygeus (=Bran the Blessed) [99] James the Just (Joseph of Arimethea) (=Anna, daughter of Lazarus and Salome) [98] Mary (=Joseph) [91-96] Hannah (=Joachim; son of Matthat the Zadok (=Sabartia); son of Eleazer the Zadok) [90] Estha (=Joiadah) [89] Eleazer the Zadok (=Hayat) [88] Eliud [87] Achim [86] Sadoc [85] Azor [84] Eliakim [83] Abard [82] Zorobabbel [81] Hadast (=Shealtiel/Pedaiah) [80] Neri (Shealtiel’s guardian and Hadast’s father) [79] Melchi [78] Addi [77] Cosam [76] Elmodam [75] Er [74] Jose [73] Jorim [72] Matthat [71] (space to conform to senior line) [70] Levi [69] Semel [68] Juda [67] Joseph [66] Eliakim [65] Menan [64] Mattatha [63] Nathan [62] King David (=Bathsheba) [61] Jesse (=Habliar) [60] Obed (=Abalit) [59] Boaz (=Ruth) [58] Missing Generations [55-57] Salma (=Rachab) [54] Nashon (=Simar) [53] Aminadab (=Thehara) [52] Kiya-tasherit (=Ram) [51] Akhenaten (Moses) (=Mery-kiya, Miriam) [50] Amenhotep III (=Tiye) [49] Tuthmosis IV (=Mutemwiya) [48] Amenhotep II (=Tiaa) [47] Tuthmosis III (=Meryetre-Hatshepsut) [46] Tuthmosis II (=Iset) [45] Tuthmosis I (=Mutnofret) [44] Amenhotep I (=Ahmose-Meritamon) [43] Ahmose I (=Ahmose-Nefertari) [42] Missing Generations [33 - 41] Amenemhet IV (=Sobeknefru, d. of Igrath) [32] Amenemhet III (=Aat) [31] Senusret III (=Mereret) [30] Senusret II (=Nofret) [29] Amenemhet II (=Keminebu) [28] Senusret I (=Nefru) [27] Tohwait (=Amenemhet I) [26] Nefert (=Senusret of Elephantine) [25] Missing Generations [15-24] Ham (=Neelata-mek) [14] Tubal Cain (=Nin-banda) [13] Lamech (=Zillah) [12] Methusael (=Edna?) [11] Mehujael (=?) [10] Irad (=Baraka?) [9] Enoch (=Edna?) [8] Cain (=Luluwa) [7] Enki and Eve [6] Enki and Nin-khursag [5] Anu and Antu (OR Ki) [4] Anshar and Kishar [3] Lahmu and Lahamu [2] Tiamat and Absu [1]

For obvious reasons, we will begin referencing all of the above as KING COLE [1-101].

King Cole I (Coilus) was a king of the Britons during the time of the Roman occupation of Britain as recounted in Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia Regum Britanniae. Cole was the son of King Marius and ruled following his father's death.

Children
Gladys Verch Lleiffer Mawr
Athildis of Camulod

According to Geoffrey, Coilus was actually brought up in Rome and thereafter favoured the company of Romans in Britain. Throughout his reign he paid Rome its tribute without question. In Britain, he allowed the nobles peace and granted them large gifts. He was succeeded by his only son, St Lucius... King Lucius, aka Llieffer Mawr = The Great Luminary. Coilus is not, however, the legendary (and historical) Old King Cole of nursery rhyme fame. (The latter comes a bit later, in a different line. Sorry about that.)

 

2. Eugein (aka Eurgen) [101] (Same as King Cole I; his sister)

 

Generation No. 102

1. King Lucius (Lleiffer Mawr) [102] KING COLE [1-101]

Lleiffer Mawr was the son of King Cole I, and was known as Lucius, King of the Britons... as well as later, Saint Lucius. Being the son of the benevolent King Coilus, he generally ruled in the manner of his father.

Married Gladys the Younger (of Siluria)

Children
Keribir, whose descendants include Magnus Maximus and Aedan mac Gabran
Gladys Verch Lleiffer Mawr, whose descendants include Constantine I (The Great)
Eurgen, who married Aminadab (great grandson of Jesus and Mary Magdalene)

Lleiffer Mawr (King Lucius) is traditionally credited with introducing Christianity into Britain. There is no contemporary evidence for such a claim, albeit for centuries the story of this "first Christian king" was widely believed, especially in Britain, where it was considered an accurate account of Christianity among the early Britons. During the English Reformation, for example, the Lucius story was used in polemics by both Catholics and Protestants; Catholics considered it evidence of papal supremacy from a very early date, while Protestants used it to bolster claims of the primacy of a British national church founded by the crown. In other words, a great deal of BS and spin-control by all sides.

This is particularly true in that the actual introduction of (non-Pauline) Christianity into Britain was almost certainly due to James the Just (Joseph of Arimethea), the son of Mary and Joseph. It was Jim Boy (as his friends and Desposyni liked to call him) who first set up shop in Glastonbury, after having been given tracts of land by the Kings of Briton (...probably Arvirargus). Unfortunately, the Roman Church’s hatred of the Despoyni (the heirs of Jesus Christ) was such that under no account could any heir of Jesus be doing their thing in Britain if the Catholic Church could prevent it. The latter had another form of Christianity to promote... and the word direct from JC was not going to be allowed, if at all possible.

In any case... and because it makes for a fair tale (as opposed to fairy tale), the Roman church’s version of Lucius’ correspondence with Rome is one worth recounting. In their obviously falsified version: prior to the formal Roman Church, the “Pope” Eleutherius send two missionaries, Fuganus and Duvianus (aka Fugitivius and Devious) to baptize the king, convert the commoners and flamens, turn pagan temples into churches [i.e., destroy anything that might contradict their narrow, politically expedient views], and establish dioceses and archdioceses where the flamens had previously held power. This they supposedly did with a typical Catholic vengeance... with an emphasis on the vengeance part. Thereafter the pope was supposedly so pleased with their accomplishments, that Fungus and Dubious recruited another wave of missionaries to aid the cause. Lucius responded by granting land and privileges to the Church. He died without heir in CE 156, thereby weakening Roman influence in Britain. Yea.

This is pretty much standard fare for the Romans and the Catholic Church in attempting to take credit for the works of others. If they can discard wills, they can certainly ignore the truth... and in fact replace the truth with self-promoting fictions in order to bolster their dubious cause. Making Lucius a saint is, of course, part and parcel of this spin and revisionist history campaign. At the same time, however, there is some evidence to suggest that King Lucius was indeed impressed by the presence of Christianity... at least in the form promoted by Joseph of Arimethea, even as the Catholic Church extended its power. [One should not assume that King Lucius was philosophically attuned to the divisions between the forms of Christianity... and for the moment, Roman influence was still very strong.]

According to Laurence Gardner (Bloodline of the Holy Grail, page 147-8):

“In the mid-2nd century, King Lucius, the great-grandson of Arvirargus, revived the spirit of the early disciples in Britain. In so doing, he was popularly held to have ‘increased the light’ of Joseph’s [of Arimethea’s] first missionaries, and accordingly became known as Lleiffer Mawr (the Great Luminary). His daughter Eurgen forged the first link between the two key Davidic successions -- that from Jesus and that from James (Joseph of Arimethea) -- when she married Aminadab, the great grandson of Jesus and Mary Magdalene (in the line of Bishop Josephes, [their son]).”

What we do know with some certainty is that before the days of the formal Roman Church, Lucius wrote earnestly to Eleutherius [the Bishop of Rome], requesting instruction in Christian government. “Eleutherius suggested that a good king was always at liberty to reject the laws of Rome -- but not the law of God.” [emphasis added] An extract:

“The Christian believers, like all the people of the kingdom, must be considered sons of the king. They are under your protection... A king is known by his government, not by whether he retains his power over the land. While you govern well, you will be a king. Unless you do this, the name of the king endures not, and you will lose the name of king.”

Clearly Eleutherius might have been well intentioned... even if his successors went out of their way to avoid the truth... as in, “The Truth Against The [Roman] World.” In fact, Eleutherius' advice is probably appropriate to any day, government, or leader of more than two followers.

It should also be pointed out that King Lucius’ descendants (5th Generation) includes Constantine the Great (312-337). Constantine, however, is NOT in the line of descent to the Merovingian Dynast [See below -- or Figure 2 above].

 

2. Athildis of Camulod [102] KING COLE [1-101]

Athildis of Camulod was the elder sister of Llieffer Mawr (King Lucius). She married Marcomer, the 24th generation descendant of King Antenor (c. 450 BCE) of the Cimmereans of Scythia on the Black Sea, descendants of the Trojan Royal House. From Athildis and Marcomer, the line then follows another 8 generations to Dagobert of the Sicambrian Franks.

According to Laurence Gardner (Bloodline of the Holy Grail, page 164) “...the Sicambrian line of ‘Franks’ -- from whom France acquired its name -- were themselves first so called after their chief Francio (a descendant of Noah) who died in 11 BC. Prior to their Scythian days, Francio’s race originated in ancient Troy.

“In the 4th century, the Sicambrian Franks were in the Rhineland, to which they had moved from Pannonia (west of the Danube) in 388 [CE] under their chiefs Genobaud, Marcomer and Sunno. Settling into the region of Germania, they established their seat at Cologne [the old Roman home away from home]. Over the next century, their armies invaded Roman Gaul and overran the area that is now Belgium and northern France. It was at this state that Genobaud’s daughter Argotta married the Fisher King Faramund (or Pharamond, who reigned 419-430 [CE], and who is often cited to have been the true patriarch of the French monarchy). Faramund was the grandson of Boaz (Anfortas) in the direct Messianic succession from Josue’s son Aminadab (Christian line), who married King Lucius’ daughter Eurgen (Arimethea line).”

My another account, Pharamond married Argotta "the mother of all the kings of France", a Sicambrian heiress daughter of Genebald (Genobaud), Lord of the Franks.

Meanwhile, King Antenor was a son of the Dardanian noble Aesyetes by Cleomestra. He was one of the wisest of the Trojan elders and counselors. Antenor was husband of Theano, daughter of Cisseus of Thrace, who bore him numerous children, mostly sons (most of whom perished during the Trojan War). Before and during the Trojan War, he was a counselor of King Priam. He advised his fellow-townsmen to send Helen back to the Greeks, and showed himself friendly to the Greeks and an advocate of peace. After the sack of Tory, according to various versions of the legend, he either rebuilt a city on the site of Troy, or settled at Cyrene, or became the founder of Patavium (currently Padua). Antenor's children by Theano include Archelochus, Acamas, Glaucus, Helicaon, Laodocus, Coon, Polybus, Agenor, Iphidamas, Laodamas, Demeleon, Eurymachus, and Crino. He was also the father of a son Pedaeus, by an unknown woman. [But then again, how could anyone tell... or care?]

 

Generation No. 103

1. Eurgen (=Aminadab) [103] King Lucius (Lleiffer Mawr) [102] KING COLE [1-101]

Eurgen, according to Laurence Gardner [Bloodline of the Holy Grail, page 147], forged the first link between the two key Davidic successions -- that from Jesus and that from James (Joseph of Arimethea) -- when she married Aminadab, the great grandson of Jesus and Mary Magdalene (in the line from Bishop Josephes). The latter line included the culmination of lineages from Dardanus, Romulus, Claudius (along the Roman branch), The Legendary Kings of Britain (along the British branch), the lineage from Troy via King Antenor and the Cimmerians, Scythians, and Sicambrians.

In other words, this woman, and her offspring, had credentials!

 

Notes

For the glorious consummation with Aminadab, we must now pick up from where we left off with Mary Magdalene and Jesus.

In the interim, one can obtain more information (like you need more) from several sources:

1) The Direct Line of Descent from Marcus Antonius to someone named Maite Montes-Bradley... has lots and lots of good stuff along the way, and can be found at:

http://www.bradleyfoundation.org/Maite/marcus/tobg01.htm

For example:

http://www.bradleyfoundation.org/Maite/marcus/tobg15.htm

There is also:

2) Caradawc Vreivach (Caraacus Strong Arm) ,Ruler of Gwent and Archenfield (Brân , Llyr , Parar , Keribir , Strada "the Fair" , Gladys "the Younger" , Lleuver Mawr (Lucius the Great) , Coel I "Old King Cole" , Meric (Marius) , Genvissa (Venus Julia) , Claudius Cæsar (Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus) , Antonia Minor , Marcus Antonius )

and

3) Pharamond (Faramund) , King of Westphalia, Duke of the East Franks (Frotmund (Frimutel) , Boaz (Anfortas) , Titurel , Manael , Catheloys (Castellors) , Eurgen , Lleuver Mawr (Lucius the Great) , Coel I "Old King Cole" , Meric (Marius) , Genvissa (Venus Julia) , Claudius Cæsar (Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus) , Antonia Minor , Marcus Antonius

 

 

Claudius

Forward to:

The Desposyni

 

 

               

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